Toying with the title

Here’s the scoop. What I have done, successfully, over the years is management consulting. Here’s the rub. That isn’t a title that gets hired.
I think the challenge is to spin my skills into ‘value-add’ statements that are so enticing that the reader can’t help but want to talk.
Bottom line, I am a horrible resume writer. I have paid real money to have it written for me, more than once, to no avail.
I hate Candidate Tracking Systems. They only work if you the role is completely repetitive and leaves absolutely no room for decision-making or creativity.
A productive member to a new team is so much more than the skills that pass through the algorithm. Plus! The tracking system is only as good as the recruiter using it.
Recruiters have a rough job. At the core level, they are sales people. They have been hired to find ‘x’ any ‘y’ will pay them. For years, I called the company that actually paid my ‘my pimp’. Why? I never heard from them, unless something was wrong. Communicating with the ‘people’ who were actually performing the activities that got everyone paid was outside of the company’s scope.
This arrangement actually worked for me as I am rather autonomous and driven by a good set of core values. I believe in an honest day’s pay for an honest day’s work. So it works.

I am a catch. I apply my core values to everything I do.
I need to find the place that appreciates those core values, too.
Maybe I will spend part of my day dissecting my current marketing document (that is all a resume is) and flipping it, focusing on what I deliver as a management consultant.

How do you say….

what you really did?
This whole write, re-write, write again thing is driving me bonkers! I have a variety of folders and sub-folders to keep track of my resume efforts.
Next steps: I think what I really need to do is continue converting my calendar notes into my freeform prose elsewhere on this site.
Maybe I should add something about managerial consulting as that seems to be more descriptive of what I truly did/do? All of these other things are just part of the role. Hmmmm.

Haven’t been the same…

Today’s post is about preparing for a phone interview I have this morning. (I have a love/hate relationship with phone interviews.)
The situation is: I need a job.

  • This one is something I could do.
  • The pay is reasonable.

Now do I want to do it?
I view this initial interview as a conversation. This is a two-way street.
The interviewer is attempting to ascertain if I will be able to do what it is he envisions needs to be done to help his organization succeed.
Got it.
In my opinion, we have already completed this checkbox item, or else we wouldn’t be having this conversation.
I have asked for the Job Description – I really believe that anyone doing any kind of a search for someone should have taken the time to define what they really need and not just a gut level awareness that they need something. The response was so generic, that it gives me cause to pause, but reading the list provided me a little insight into the hiring manager’s style and gave me a hint about what has annoyed him in previous interviews.
I need to communicate with him that I am flexible and comfortable with change.
I need to get him to define his terms. What does he consider a ‘scrum meeting’?
I need to know how they treat contractors.

Ultimately, I decided to do the interview. It is scheduled. It will be a good opportunity for me to exercise my skills. This means, I was able to get beyond the gate-keeper in the process. My biggest challenge has been getting the youngsters to understand me as my non-traditional experience doesn’t fit well into the new millenia checklists that have been developed over the last few years. I don’t think it is ageism as much as it is inexperience.

since you had your little crash…’ The first lyrics I heard from the album that quickly became my favorite. It is one of those songs that I still remember where I was and exactly what I was doing when I heard it for the very, first time.
Note to self: write a post on the entire album, it might be a fun little trip down memory lane.

Eagles_HellFreezesOver

Blame it all on my roots

This little march down memory lane has been refreshing. I have remembered a few things I had forgotten.

  1. I like using song lyrics as section headers – this started with my grad school papers eons ago.
  2. I have been in iterative design and development for a long, long time – kind of nice to find more legacy artifacts.
  3. Pictures, pictures, pictures! Oh my goodness these are spread throughout my hard drive.
  4. A lot of things changed during my tenure at my latest gig. It is more than a little unsettling to put it all together.
  5. I think in dates. Give me a date and possibly an experience or question and I can tell you everything I was doing that day. This is scary!

 

Bring on the IoT

As I have been walking backward through my life experiences to create the resume that will open the doors for discussions about the next life challenge to undertake, it is hard to summarize everything I have done and keep from getting distracted.

One of the primary roles I have had consistently for years has been ‘intake’. I love this part of the job. This is the opportunity to review the forward-looking proposals and evaluate how we could deliver it, or not.
It isn’t an ‘all-knowing’ skill, but more of a leveraging skill. The key to success is being able to identify the brainiacs around me and working with them to business-ize the proposals. I am really good at this. The issue is communicating the value to prospective new teams.

I did find something buried in the links of interest I have collected over the years. This one makes me smile. I love that the auto industry doesn’t want to give up the ‘connected device’ challenges automatically to apple or google. Wonder if any of these consortia members have any openings and are near me? It would be fun to influence the future, again.

 

Bad timing to change my password

Yesterday was crazy busy!  I work in an environment where all users are required to change their password incredibly frequently. Yesterday was that day for me.

Upon logging in and receiving the notification that my password was about to expire, I did my due diligence and went about the tasks that are necessary to complete that task.  I know it should be as simple as logging into a single place and doing it once, but it isn’t.   It takes a lot of time and at least one hard boot of my device to complete this task.  Upon successfully finishing this laborious, time-consuming task, I went on about my day.

Fast forward:: Life would have been good if I hadn’t had to change sites to be able to get to my appointments.  The password change came back to bite me.  Thank God I had built in an hour for lunch and travel, otherwise I wouldn’t have been able to resolve my technical issues and arrive on time for my meeting.  To be honest, this is actually one of the things my favorite manager likes about me.  He likes that when I encounter these little challenges, I don’t just throw up my hands and walk away.

I get it.  I understand that not all of the servers that service the tools that I have to use to do my jobs all get updated in the ‘blink of an eye’.  I get that ‘real-time’ means the configuration of the portal that I am currently using to access data and sometimes the tools.  Guess I have been around long enough to realize there is processing required to use every portal, everywhere.  There are reasons for daily maintenance windows and overnight batch processes.

Knowing that gives me a baseline to use to troubleshoot my own issues.  This saves so much money for all of my employers.  I can fix it myself.  I don’t have to tie-up a minimum of one support resource to resolve my basic issues.

For me?  This is a baseline metric for anyone who claims to be a IT professional.  How much does it cost us to keep you productive?

I signed up to produce ‘TPS Reports’ – really

I was recruited.  Actively pursued to take on the responsibility to deliver the onboarding factory for this communications company.

They needed me.  I needed them.  The timing was right, the environment was wrong.

There was a team in place, they needed some organization and leadership.  As a team, we were able to clear the backed-up pipeline in less than ninety days.

What we didn’t know is that we were picking up the wreckage from the previous attempts.  We wound up dissecting the processes and redesigning the delivery directly to the architect of the nightmare, the creator of the out-of-control-pipeline.  This taught me to ask a few more questions before jumping in with both feet.  Test the waters.  Do your homework.  Unless this is a greenfield project there are people attached and somewhere someone is connected to this chaos. Be careful.

This happened so long ago that it is truly a distant memory but the emotions that came running back when I started thinking about what happened were disconcerting.

I really think it is those damages that led me to stay in my next position so long.  Far beyond the expiration date for the role, so it is time to be moving on.

This is the place where I literally produced TPS Reports.  I tried to make jokes about ‘flair’ and ‘red swingline staplers’ but my humor was lost on my fellow cube dwellers.