What a long strange trip it’s been…

One the biggest challenges I have with my resume is traversing up and down the communications stack. When I started, there wasn’t an internet. People were struggling with the closed systems that represented the communications channels in those days.Email? There wasn’t any.
Okay, maybe a little. I was at the university and we were using VAX systems. I remember notes were handwritten – er taken in shorthand, transcribed into an email and forwarded to the appropriate ‘routing list’. We managed these ‘routing lists’ in steno pads in the administration office. We were bleeding edge.
The commands we had to execute to get that email from my desk to the Dean’s office was ridiculous. Today, I send emails that are shorter in length than the mere command was to make the connection in those days.
We had to use these communication tools to stay in contact with the other campuses, but it was truly a challenge.
There was no constant link. To connect, you had to know the commands to open the socket, make the connection, upload the changes and download any updates. Yes, it was as manual as that sounds. I have a notebook, somewhere, that deciphers what each of those connection sounds meant. Man do I not miss that world.
I remember being thrilled when I had mastered the whole mail thing. I really believe it was this ability to digest the technical information, translate it into human-being language, and execute is how I got the job managing the pc labs at the university until I finished my master’s degree. This was unheard of since I was a business major and there was an erroneous expectation that only engineering students could understand the magic that happens beneath the surface.
But I got it. It makes sense to me. I used to spend my Friday nights, manning the lab and teaching the computer scientists how to email their ‘whatever file’ to wherever. Typically, I could barely understand what their files said, but I could sure help them get it shipped to wherever. It always amused me that they could do their work, but had no idea how to use the vax utilities.
Just about the time I had it down to an art and was providing coaching sessions Friday nights and weekends, it was time to move to IMAP (Unix). Half of the recruiters I have spoken to in the past two weeks weren’t even alive when this was happening in my life. May the complexity remain buried for them.

 

Bring on the IoT

As I have been walking backward through my life experiences to create the resume that will open the doors for discussions about the next life challenge to undertake, it is hard to summarize everything I have done and keep from getting distracted.

One of the primary roles I have had consistently for years has been ‘intake’. I love this part of the job. This is the opportunity to review the forward-looking proposals and evaluate how we could deliver it, or not.
It isn’t an ‘all-knowing’ skill, but more of a leveraging skill. The key to success is being able to identify the brainiacs around me and working with them to business-ize the proposals. I am really good at this. The issue is communicating the value to prospective new teams.

I did find something buried in the links of interest I have collected over the years. This one makes me smile. I love that the auto industry doesn’t want to give up the ‘connected device’ challenges automatically to apple or google. Wonder if any of these consortia members have any openings and are near me? It would be fun to influence the future, again.

 

Telecommunications dots

One of the processes I am most proud of defining, developing and delivering during my tenure was the onboarding process. Kudos to my leadership for tossing it my way and allowing me to do it on my own.
Every onboarding activity I did was personalized. Yes, the basics where ‘check-the-box’ simple, but everyone who joined our ranks was an individual and they deserved individual attention.

There are a lot of things that have to be remembered whenever you start something new. Finally, I standardized on converting my checklist to individual notebooks created as the hiring processes proceeded.

This became the new hire’s ‘touch stone’ to be used as a start. This became a shared activity between the new hire and the various team members. Folks who were more adventurous enjoyed doing these activities like a scavenger hunt. Others who were more linear requested more ‘checklists’. That was a lot less fun.

Standardizing the work station provided for each resource went a long ways toward simplifying the time to productivity for each resource we brought in.
Writing the requirements for the ‘work station’ provided really helped set the baseline for the expectations the new hire would be able to perform on the first day.
It is much more difficult to produce a baseline for industry knowledge. Every industry has its own set of facts and history that new hires should be exposed. Pique their curiosity.
We were in the telecommunications industry. We were doing ‘mobile first’ design and delivery, so it really doesn’t hurt understand a little bit about the history of telecommunications. I like to focus on telecommunications in the United States.

I am old. I remember when Ma bell was the only game in town. I remember when it was illegal to own a telephone. My mother was a telephone operator in the 40’s and 50’s. Heck she was downsized by ‘mama bell’ because she chose to follow her husband when they shipped him to Colorado after they shot him with an atomic bomb. But that is a story for another day.

I hate resumes

Naively I assumed that the ability to survive and thrive for over 6 years in a turbulent, ‘fast-paced’ information technology organization delivering the tools that facilitated the ‘un-carrier’ revolution.

Maybe that is where I need to start. Instead of formatting a resume as a brochure to get the conversation started, I need to create the ‘roadmap’ that takes the reader through my experiences.

Connect the dots for the reader!

Job descriptions ugh!

Why I write in notepad rather than the web ui.
I always need to roll back!

I am in the midst of the job search. Joy of joys!
Means I am reading job descriptions. The problem with the descriptions is they rarely reflect the actual activity.
Add to the problem I am having to update my CV and explain it to the world, I am getting a little frustrated.

Had an appointment with a recruiter yesterday. Wouldn’t say it went incredibly well.
Okay, the first half hour was okay – the account manager had some specifics she wanted to discuss.
The opportunities are great fits, but –
1. I am on hiatus for x length of time. Unless blah, blah, blah
2. I am not doing that commute – you cannot pay me enough to do that drive daily!

The recruiter and I were left to discuss.
I really felt like this was a pity meeting because she had been given my resume 2 months ago when my other account guy moved onto something else.
We never connected.
When I found out about my end date, I reached out to my network. I have more than a few friends who work there and like working with me. She started getting bombarded with my resume.

Last week, we scheduled two appointments.
She missed the first one because of parking. I totally get it.
I cancelled the second one because it was at the end of the day I was waling out the door. I get EQ points for recognizing that fact.

This week we met, yesterday.
I was early. I did not want a recurrence of the parking fiasco last week.

Let’s just say, we didn’t hit it off.
She printed my resume as we walked into the room.
She made a lot of notes during our conversation.
She provided me feedback and gave me samples of resumes that had recently been placed in scrum master roles.
She provided harsh criticism. Well deserved? Maybe, maybe not.

I read the samples.
Good heavens! These look like a laundry list of activities I classify in the category ‘other duties as assigned’.

Back to the drawing board.

Below is a scrum master job description:

**Need Locals and Face to Face interview is required**Required Skills:
***MUST HAVE VERY STRONG WRITTEN AND VERBAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS***
3 years as a Scrum Master, not a Project Manager that ran scrum meetings, a designated scrum master.
Experience working on customer-facing applications (web and/or mobile)

Additional Skills:
Certified Scrum Master (CSM)

Job Description:
– Senior Scrum Master

Description:

The Customer Systems team at Client is responsible for continually enhancing our website, mobile apps and the applications our employees use to provide excellent customer service. We believe that routinely shipping increments of functionality, collaboratively planning and working to continuously improve will allow us to deliver innovations to our customers more often.

As a Scrum Master at Client you will be responsible for being the rock-star facilitator between development teams and product owners while remaining the shining example of Agile Scrum. You will be expected to hold the standard Scrum events, assist product owners with achieving a well-groomed backlog, removing impediments, and empowering your team(s) to continually evolve. 

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
Facilitate the Agile Delivery Practice
– Facilitate sprint planning, daily stand-up meetings, reviews/demos,
retrospectives, and release planning meetings for 2-3 product teams 
– Track and communicate team commitments, velocity and sprint/release progress
– Remove or escalate team impediments that jeopardize sprint goals
– Ensure the development teams are practicing the Agile principles
– Identify, suggest and collaborate with development and product owner on measurable
improvements for the team(s)
– Coach, train and support other scrum masters within the organization

Support the Product Owner
– Promote and contribute to the betterment of the product backlog 
– Promote and contribute to internal and external communications, improving
transparency, and radiating information 
– Facilitate value-based prioritization and resolution for new stories

Support the Product Team
– Participate proactively in developing and maintaining team standards, tools, and
best practices
– Identify and escalate and remove impediments to sprint goals 
– Facilitate discussion and conflict resolution
– Empower the team to self-organize
Other duties as assigned
– Embody the Alaska Spirit and conduct oneself with Professionalism, Integrity,
Resourcefulness, and Caring

Qualifications
– Bachelor’s degree or combination of relevant education and experience required
– Minimum 3+ years of experience as a Scrum Master required
– Minimum 5+ years of experience in technology industry and customer-centric
applications required
– Comprehensive understanding of Agile, Scrum XP software development methodologies,
values, and procedures required
– Certified Scrum Master (CSM) is preferred
– Excellent interpersonal skills, ability to work with diverse personality types
– Ability to understand technical issues at a high level
– Exceptional communication, organization, and time management skills
– Ability to lead and coach the team to reach their highest potential
– Collaborative approach to driving decisions
– Strong analytical and problem solving skills with a high attention to detail
– High school diploma or equivalent required
– Minimum age of 18
– Must be authorized to work in the U.S.

Cold, cruel world

It is just business, but it is my business! I need a job.
What does that mean?
Updating the CV!!
Reviewing, rehashing everything done in the past assignment.
Meeting people.
Reading job descriptions.

I am a scrum master. I like facilitating success. I love continuous improvement. I used kanban to raise my kids!

Kind of gets my goat when I read something like this “The Scrum Master role does not consume a lot of time.” Yeppers, I am going to apply for a job there because of the level of respect included in the body of the advertisement.

Job search prep – personal

It is no secret that I am soon out of work and truly cannot afford to be, so I have been traipsing across all of the information in front of me, while trying to maintain a level of professionalism in the job I am exiting. I believe in doing my best until the end, no matter how tempting it would be to drop to petty whining and sabotaging. Not this gal! But that is another post, for another day after the immediate challenges are abated.

While reviewing my work history for files and documents that are my own and can become some of my broader portfolio, I started looking at some of the quotes I have collected while evaluating my current situation. It is interesting to see what I have been thinking over all of these years. Below is a quote from an article I saved when I realized this job that is ending was headed this direction.

The trick to advancing your career and getting paid more is to add value by making certain your contributions are worth more than you’re paid.

Two years ago was a very emotional time for me, professionally. The manager I had been working with since I walked in the front door was being promoted. A well-deserved promotion and essentially one of my personal goals for measuring my success in this role. I was thrilled.

I wasn’t as thrilled when the next shoe dropped and I found out he was moving on and I was being left behind with a new manager. A green wannabe manager. Tough role to fill. Things haven’t been great, either way.

The toughest part for me was changing my style. We never really found a good cadence of mutual respect and appreciation. We would go months without having a conversation. Never a good sign.